The State of Healthcare Facilities in the Field of Cardiovascular Diseases: Reflections from a Public Cardiac Hospital, Uttar Pradesh

Published

2020-03-31

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47203/IJCH.2020.v32i01.030

Keywords:

Cardiovascular diseases, India, Public Healthcare Sector, Cardiac Hospitals and field observatio

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Short Article

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Abstract

Background: Literature suggest that majority of Indians belonging to lower socio-economic status (SES) are dependent on public health sector but still there is higher rate of deaths among them due to cardiac diseases. Objective: The aims of this paper are twofold: (i) To depict the ground realities of a public cardiac hospital, and (ii) To identify the key challenges for the effective policy implementation and control of CVD. Method: Using direct field based observation, experiences and field notes. Result and Conclusion: India’s public healthcare sector for cardiac patients suffers from problem of accessibility and affordability. Further, prevalence of prohibited practices makes things worse for the poor patients.

How to Cite

1.
Singh A. The State of Healthcare Facilities in the Field of Cardiovascular Diseases: Reflections from a Public Cardiac Hospital, Uttar Pradesh. Indian J Community Health [Internet]. 2020 Mar. 31 [cited 2022 Dec. 8];32(1):151-3. Available from: https://www.iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/article/view/1259

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