Factors influencing HIV testing uptake among priority populations in a resettlement colony of a North Indian city

Authors

  • Ishita Choudhary School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7681-3700
  • Venkatesan Chakrapani Centre for Sexuality and Health Research and Policy (C-SHaRP), Chennai & Wellcome Trust / DBT India Senior Fellow, The Humsafar Trust, Mumbai https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9998-9135
  • Manmeet Kaur School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh
  • Sandeep Mittal Chandigarh State AIDS Control Society, Chandigarh https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7653-9019
  • Rajesh Kumar Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9750-3437

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47203/IJCH.2020.v32i01.008

Keywords:

Odds Ratio, Cross-Sectional Studies, Sexual Partners, Logistic Models, HIV, Social Stigma, Mass Screening

Abstract

Background: The recent adoption of HIV ‘test and treat’ strategy by India’s National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) necessitates an urgent need to improve HIV testing among priority populations at risk for HIV. Aim & Objectives: To identify barriers to and facilitators of HIV testing among priority populations such as pregnant women, tuberculosis patients, sexual partners of people living with HIV (PLHIV) and key populations; and to examine the role of new HIV testing modalities (e.g., non-invasive HIV testing) in improving HIV testing. Settings and Design: A cross sectional survey was conducted among priority populations in a resettlement colony of Chandigarh, North India. Materials and methods: A total of 160 participants were recruited using non-probability-based sampling. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test was used to assess differences between priority populations who had been tested or not tested for HIV. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to identify significant predictors of HIV testing status. Results: Participants with higher HIV knowledge (Adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] =1.7, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.5) and family support (aOR=8.2, 95% CI 1.9 to 35.3) had higher odds of getting tested for HIV. Major barriers identified were fear of anticipated discrimination and previous bad experiences in government HIV testing centres, and key facilitators were empathetic attitude of the staff and government initiatives (e.g., free-of-cost tests, reimbursements of travel costs). For periodic testing, priority populations preferred non-invasive (non-blood-based) HIV tests. Conclusions: Interventions to promote HIV testing among priority populations need to reduce HIV-related stigma, and offer non-invasive HIV testing in public hospitals.

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References

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Published

2020-03-31

How to Cite

1.
Choudhary I, Chakrapani V, Kaur M, Mittal S, Kumar R. Factors influencing HIV testing uptake among priority populations in a resettlement colony of a North Indian city. Indian J Community Health [Internet]. 2020 Mar. 31 [cited 2024 Jun. 21];32(1):31-8. Available from: https://www.iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/article/view/1236

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