SOHAM: SEARCHING OUR-OWN HEALTH AFTER MEDICINE By Understanding Physician Mortality Data from The United States

Published

2020-03-31

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47203/IJCH.2020.v32i01.031

Keywords:

SOHAM, Physician Mortality, United States, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Occupational Mortality Surveillance, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Intentional Self-Harm, Occupational Health

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Issue

Section

Short Article

Authors

  • Deepak Gupta Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States
  • Sarwan Kumar Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States
  • Shushovan Chakrabortty Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States`

Abstract

While SEARCHING OUR-OWN HEALTH AFTER MEDICINE (SOHAM), we as aging physicians have to first explore and expose our mortality with underlying uniqueness of causes for physician mortality. Herein, publicly available data at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from National Occupational Mortality Surveillance program of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health comes in handy. As compared to all occupational workers in the United States, intentional self-harm, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s and other degenerative disease were more likely causes of death while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diseases of the respiratory system, ischemic heart disease and diseases of the heart were less likely causes of death among physicians in the United States. Summarily, we as physicians may have somewhat overcome sufferings of our lungs and hearts but surrendered to sufferings of our brains and minds and therefore must envisage devising physical, psychological, socioeconomic and spiritual interventions for constantly bettering our living.

How to Cite

1.
Gupta D, Kumar S, Chakrabortty S. SOHAM: SEARCHING OUR-OWN HEALTH AFTER MEDICINE By Understanding Physician Mortality Data from The United States. Indian J Community Health [Internet]. 2020 Mar. 31 [cited 2022 Aug. 17];32(1):154-60. Available from: https://www.iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/article/view/1343

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Author Biography

Deepak Gupta, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States

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References

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